Mataki | Greek Evil Eye

Mataki, or Mati (Μάτι as known in Greek) can be traced back to Ancient Greece. In most regions in Greece, there is still the strong belief that having a mati causes supernatural power to protect the person who wears one, from evil thoughts and actions of others to them. They are not found just in Greek tradition. There is a widely extended belief of their supernatural force among many Mediterranean and Asian tribes and cultures.

People in Greece also use them in lucky charms, that hang them somewhere in their houses, in order to bring luck to their homes and to decorate the lucky charms of the New Year, called gouria (γούρια). Read more...

Athens: The Eye of Greece (1961) | British Pathé Video

Take a tour of ancient Athens in the 1960s with this Pathé travelogue and see what John Milton referred to as ‘..the eye of Greece, mother of arts And eloquence.’

Various locations around Greece. Athens: L/S of a young woman, Gaye Ashwood, walking up the steps of the Acropolis. M/S of Gaye walking past columns, tilt up to the blue sky. C/U of a crumbling column, tilt up to reveal its length. Low angle M/S of some more columns, panning shot to show the Parthenon of Pericles. L/S, looking between two columns, of a ruined temple in the distance. Low angle M/S of the same temple – instead of columns, statues of women hold up the roof. Low angle M/S of one of statue columns. L/S, taken through the trees, of the Acropolis on top of a hill, panning shot across to contrast these ancient ruins with the modern city of Athens.

L/S of an aeroplane landing on a runway, panning shot of the plane as it taxis. Various M/Ss of the plane taxiing. M/S of passengers coming down the stairs of the plane. Low angle M/S of some ancient ruins in the city centre, tilt down to busy traffic driving past. L/S of traffic and modern buildings, looking through the columns of an ancient ruin. L/S of an apartment block, tilt down to a busy road. Various L/Ss of traffic, trams and pedestrians in Athens.

Low angle shot of a statue in front of a modern hotel. Low angle shot of a palm tree in front of the King George hotel. M/S of an old man in a park using a camera on a tripod, panning shot to the photo’s subject: a young boy on a bench. C/U of the photographer and his camera. M/S of a sign for a Taverna. L/S of the Taverna with tables outside, a man carrying a basket walks down some crumbling stairs next to the Taverna. M/S of two men sitting outside at a table. The man carrying the basket enters and offers them some grapes. C/U of one of the men eating a bunch of grapes. M/S of the grape seller holding a bunch. Low angle shot of two windows with traditionally designed bags and rugs hanging from the shutters, tilt down to a doorway with the words – ‘Art House Gallery’ painted above it. The shopkeeper comes out of the door with two female tourists. He points to some brass pots outside the shop. C/U of a clothe bag. C/U of some brass pots, tilt to a lower shelf with more pots on. M/S of the man showing a brass pot to one of the tourists.

Pireus/ Piraeus and Vouliagmini L/S, looking through pine trees, of the harbour at Piraeus. M/S of a boy walking along the harbour, panning shot across the water to show moored sailing boats. L/S of the harbour taken from the cliff tops. L/S from the top of a hill looking down to the rocky beach and blue sea at Vouliagmini. L/S of the crowded beach and hills behind Vouliagmini. M/S of sunbather lounging on the sand. L/S of the sea – several swimmers and a canoeist are in the foreground. M/S of young people in swim wear playing volley ball on a court near the beach, panning shot follows one rather ample girl in a bikini. M/S of muscle men working out on rings and bars on the beach. M/S of women sunbathing on deck chairs – “here, a million Aphrodites enchant …”. Top shot of two young women in swimsuits lying on sun loungers chatting. L/S of the Temple of Zeus – “never far away, the symbols of greatness”. Low angle panning shot of the temple’s columns. L/S, taken between two trees, of a row of ancient columns.

BRITISH PATHÉ’S STORY Before television, people came to movie theatres to watch the news. British Pathé was at the forefront of cinematic journalism, blending information with entertainment to popular effect. Over the course of a century, it documented everything from major armed conflicts and seismic political crises to the curious hobbies and eccentric lives of ordinary people. If it happened, British Pathé filmed it. Now considered to be the finest newsreel archive in the world, British Pathé is a treasure trove of 85,000 films unrivalled in their historical and cultural significance. British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 136,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1984. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/

Diples : taste the delicious Greek Christmas rolls

Diples or Thiples is a Greek dessert from the Peloponnese, made of thin sheet-like dough. They are essentially the same as angel wings, except that they are dipped in syrup rather than served dry. The dough is rolled into long, thin strips, fried and folded in hot oil and then dipped in a sugar or honey syrup.

In case you are not familiar with them, Diples get their name from the Greek word for “fold.”

They are thin sheets of dough that are folded while being fried into a crispy package that is drizzled with honey and dusted with cinnamon and ground walnuts.

This recipe has been adapted from the cookbook of the Ladies Philoptochos Society of Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Church in Elgin, Illinois.

Ingredients

  • egg yolks
  • 1 whole egg
  • 2 tbsp. butter (melted and cooled)
  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 1 tbsp. brandy
  • 2 1/2 to 3 cups flour (all-purpose)
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 2 inches of vegetable oil (or shortening for frying)
  • For the Syrup:
  • 1 cup honey
  • 2 tsp. water
  • Garnish: cinnamon (ground)
  • 1/2 cup ground walnuts

Steps to Make It

  • Gather the ingredients.
  • Sift the flour with the baking powder into a bowl and set aside.
  • Using a hand mixer or stand mixer, beat the egg yolks and whole egg on high speed until the eggs are thick and smooth and the color is light yellow – about 4 to 5 minutes.

  • Combine the melted butter, orange juice, and brandy. With the mixer running, add to the egg mixture until incorporated.

  • Add the flour in 1/2 cup increments until the dough comes together and doesn’t stick to the sides of the bowl. If you have a dough hook for your mixer, you can attach it and knead the dough with the machine. If not, turn the dough out on to a lightly floured surface and knead by hand.

  • Continue kneading the dough until it has a smooth and elastic texture, about 5 to 8 minutes.

  • Separate the dough into four pieces, and rest it on the counter covered with plastic wrap for about half an hour.

  • After the dough has rested, roll out each section into rectangles about the size of a sheet pan. The dough should be very thin about 1/16th of an inch thick or about the thickness of a piece of cardboard.

  • Using a knife or rolling cutter, cut the dough into sheets that are about 5 inches wide and about 10 inches long. Lay the cut pieces on a tray separated by wax paper sheets to prevent them from sticking together.

  • To fry, you will need a pan with a wide bottom and a depth of about 4 to 5 inches. The oil will need to be poured to about 3 inches in depth.

  • Heat the oil or vegetable shortening until shimmering but not smoking hot. If the oil is too hot your diples will get too dark and will cook too quickly, making it difficult to roll them.

  • Place a dough sheet in the hot oil. Using two large cooking forks, hold the end furthest away from you and roll the sheet away from you. You can pierce the sheet with the fork or simply place the edge between the tines of the fork.

  • Hold the roll in the oil until both sides are a light golden color.

  • These cook quickly so be sure to have your ingredients and tools in place. It’s best to cut all the dough sheets before you begin frying. Drain and remove the rolls to a tray layered with paper towels and stand them on their ends to prevent them from becoming mushy.

  • To make the syrup, combine the honey and the water and heat gently on the stovetop or in the microwave. Place the diples on a serving platter and drizzle with the syrup. Sprinkle with ground walnuts and ground cinnamon.

  • To keep the diples crisp, do not add the syrup until just before you are ready to serve.

  • Enjoy!

    Text source Wikipedia, thespruceeats.com

The Greek winter street hot drink

Let’s warm ourselves a little bit with this Greek drink with origins from Turkey, named salepi. 

=&0=&is a flour made from the tubers of the orchid genus Orchis. Salep flour is consumed in beverages and desserts, especially in places that were formerly part of the Ottoman Empire where it is a traditional winter beverage. An increase in consumption is causing local extinctions of orchids in parts of Turkey and Iran.

Properties

~ It is concidered as an aphrodisiac: Salep, known as “the the Man herb ” that gave couples male children, and the cinnamon with cloves, considered anti-impotence for centuries !!
It is demulcent against cough, bronchial and asthma.
~ Helps against  cold, catarrh and flu.
~ Against sinusitis, nausea, vomiting, bloating, heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease (ginger).
~ Against  indigestion and stomach disorders and dysentery.

~ Helps in gastric ulcer and duodenum (salep with cinnamon).
~ Facilitates blood circulation, stimulating the function of kidneys and the heart, relieves headaches, menstrual pain and menopausal syndrome (cinnamon).
~ Relieves the problems of the prostate gland, and hemorrhoids.
~ Relieves muscular and rheumatic pains (cinnamon with cloves).
~ It has detoxifying properties (cinnamon), antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects .
~ Helps Diabetes setting (without sugar), cholesterol and triglycerides .
~ Rich in minerals, phosphorus and calcium (salep), magnesium and iron (cinnamon), potassium and vitamin C (ginger, cloves), stimulates the whole organism.
~ It helps in quick recovery of weakened institutions, children and elderly.

~ Removes fatigue, physical and mental.
~ Soothes nerves, eliminates stress and tension.
~ It facilitates brain function, improves memory, gives being and alertness (cinnamon).
~ Excellent coffee substitute.

How we make hot salep

1 small cup of water or milk simmer with 2 cloves, cinnamon, a pinch of ginger powder, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1/2 teaspoon salepi

sources wikipedia and bachari.gr